10 Easiest languages to learn for English speakers | 2022

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Easiest languages to learn for English speakers: Looking for some easy languages to learn as an English speaker? Here are some suggestions.

Certain languages come more naturally to certain people than others.

There’s a good reason you hear so many stories of new language learners who have achieved proficiency in a short of months; they are true. They choose one of the more straightforward languages to learn.

Learning a new language can open the door to many fascinating new experiences and opportunities, ranging from interacting with a diverse range of people and cultures to furthering your profession to studying and working in a foreign country.

But, with so many different languages to select from, how do you decide which one to devote the majority of your time to learning and understanding?

Even though learning a foreign language presents its own set of difficulties, the reality is that some languages will be easier for skilled English speakers to become adept in than other languages.

Why? Languages that are more closely linked to English have some aspects and characteristics in common with English, making them easier for English speakers to take up and understand.

Among the items covered are sentence structure and vocabulary, tones and sounds, and the writing system.

In other words, how simple or difficult it is for you to acquire a language will rely not only on the language itself but also on whatever other languages you are already fluent in, or at the very least, are familiar with.

Keep in mind that various distinct factors determine the length of time it takes you to learn a language.

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10 Easiest languages to learn for English speakers

Here are the easiest languages to learn for English speakers

1. Swedish:

Around 10 million people speak Swedish, most of whom live in Sweden. However, a tiny minority of Swedish speakers may be found in Finland, where Swedish is also the official language.

Because it is a Germanic language, Swedish is considered to be on the easier side of the learning curve for English speakers.

Swedish grammatical rules and sentence construction are not unduly hard, even though mastering the pronunciation may take some time to perfect.

Learning this Scandinavian language does have some more difficult aspects, such as getting used to the three additional vowels that are present.

Aside from that, you’ll need to become acquainted with uncommon compound phrases such as “jordnötter,” which means “dirt nuts,” but which means “dirt nuts” in English, and “kofngare,” which means “bumper,” but which means “cowcatcher” in English.

2. Spanish:

Because of its practicality and vast reach, Spanish has long been the language of choice for English speakers who want to study a new language. In addition, it is one of the most straightforward languages to learn for English speakers.

Spanish is a Romance language, which means that it derives from Latin — just like many English terms do — therefore, the name of the game is cognates, cognates, and more cognates in this case. To take a few examples, correcto means “correct,” delicioso means “wonderful,” and pizza means “pizza.”

The pronunciation of Spanish is likewise rather basic. It is a phonetic language, which means that most of its words are pronounced in the same way they are written.

Grammar haters, on the other hand, beware: Spanish has a plethora of various verb tenses and exceptions to grammar norms, making it difficult to communicate effectively.

It should be noted that the tenses are generally the same as those we use in English, so learning them will not be as tough as you may expect.

However, the fact that Spanish is so prevalent in our daily lives may be the most compelling argument for learning it.

In recent data, Spanish is the second most spoken language globally, with over 450 million native speakers, placing it behind only English.

You’ve most likely heard Spanish spoken on television, on the radio, and perhaps by people of your community at one point or another. It’s all around you, so you’ve already gotten a head start on learning it!

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3. Portuguese:

According to the United Nations, Portuguese is spoken by around 234 million people all over the world. Portugal and Brazil, and six African countries (including Angola, Cape Verde, and Mozambique) speak it as their official language, making it a very useful second language to have under your belt.

When it comes to language origins, Portuguese is similar to Spanish in that it is derived from Latin and uses the same alphabet as English, which provides a little advantage to English speakers who are studying it.

There are major differences between European Portuguese and Brazilian Portuguese that should be kept in mind when learning the language.

In reality, depending on the sort of Portuguese you are learning, everything from the pronunciation to the vocabulary might differ significantly from one another.

Of course, which one you should concentrate on will differ depending on where and how you intend to utilize it. Therefore, Portuguese is one of the easiest languages to learn for English speakers.

4. Dutch:

Dutch is closely linked to English, just as Frisian is to English. This language has numerous parallels to English, particularly when it comes to lexical structure. Several terms, for example, “plastic,” “water,” and “light,” are the same in both the Dutch and the English languages.

The pronunciation of this language will most likely prove to be the most difficult component of learning it for English speakers.

Flemish, the dialect spoken in the Flanders region of Belgium, is nearly equivalent to Dutch in terms of pronunciation.

Dutch and Flemish speakers can communicate relatively readily with one another even though their languages differ in pronunciation, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions.

There are over 24 million people who speak Dutch worldwide. It is well worth studying if you intend to live and work in the Netherlands or in one of the other nations where Dutch is an official language, such as Suriname Aruba, or the Netherlands Antilles.

5. Italian:

Dutch is closely linked to English, just as Frisian is to English. This language has numerous parallels to English, particularly when it comes to lexical structure.

Several terms, for example, “plastic,” “water,” and “light,” are the same in both the Dutch and the English languages. The pronunciation of this language will most likely prove to be the most difficult component of learning it for English speakers.

Flemish, the dialect spoken in the Flanders region of Belgium, is nearly equivalent to Dutch in terms of pronunciation.

Dutch and Flemish speakers can communicate relatively readily with one another even though their languages differ in pronunciation, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions.

There are over 24 million people who speak Dutch worldwide. It is well worth studying if you intend to live and work in the Netherlands or in one of the other nations where Dutch is an official language, such as Suriname Aruba, or the Netherlands Antilles.

6. French:

Another important Romance language is included on our list, and it is a popular choice among language learners.

Even though French (and/or its multiple dialects and creoles) is not as easy to learn as other of its language siblings, it is spoken by approximately 300 million people in many different places of the world (including France, Canada, Belgium, and Madagascar, to mention a few examples).

The vast amount of shared vocabulary between French and the other Romance languages, as with the other Romance languages, is the most significant advantage of learning French. However, this isn’t exclusively because it has linguistic roots.

When France and England fought and conquered each other for centuries, crucial linguistic components were transferred from one country to the other.

This primarily manifested itself in French terminology introduced into the English language, such as avant-garde and à la carte. However, there was also word-sharing from English to French during this period (e.g. weekends).

Although French pronunciation can be challenging at first, we frequently hear French accents in popular culture, making them less difficult to imitate than you might imagine.

7. German:

A Germanic language, as the name implies, is one that is spoken in Germany. Numerous parallels may be seen between it and English, including the use of a shared alphabet, similar sentence structure, and recognizable vocabulary.

Take, for example, everyday German words like “Wasser,” which means water, “Apfel,” which means apple, and “Fisch,” which means fish, which are extremely similar to their English counterparts.

One feature of German that English speakers have difficulty with is the pronunciation, particularly when it comes to longer compound phrases such as “Fremdschämen” (cringe) or “Verschlimmbessern” (improvement) (to worsen or exacerbate).

However, while German may not be as easy for English speakers to grasp as Dutch or Norwegian, it is an extremely useful language to learn because it is spoken by more than 100 million people throughout Central Europe, including Austria, Switzerland, Luxembourg, and is therefore extremely useful to learn.

8. Indonesian:

Indonesian is one of the most frequently spoken languages globally, with over 40 million native speakers and more than 150 million non-native speakers. It is the second most extensively spoken language in the world after English.

Even though Indonesian is an Austronesian language, it differs significantly from the Germanic and Romance languages on this list. However, it is surprisingly simple to learn for English speakers.

This is partly because Indonesian is a phonetic language, which means that words are spelled exactly how they sound in the native language.

Furthermore, the sentence structure in Indonesia is comparable to that of English, and its grammatical rules are quite straightforward.

To convert a singular word into a plural term, you must repeat the word or add an extra one. As a result, “kid” is pronounced “Anak,” while “children” is pronounced “Anak-Anak.” Isn’t it simple?

9. Swahili:

In addition to being a Bantu language, Swahili is also a very useful second language to have, as it is widely spoken throughout East African countries such as Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, and Tanzania.

The language of Swahili is believed to be spoken as a first language by approximately 16 million people and as a second language by up to 80 million people; however, exact figures are difficult to come by.

If you’ve seen the Disney classic “The Lion King,” you’re probably already familiar with several Swahili phrases, such as “rafiki” (friend) and “simba” (lion) (lion). “

Most Swahili words are rather simple to pronounce, and many sounds extremely similar to their English counterparts. For example, the word “polisi” means “police,” and the word “baiskeli” means “bicycle.”

Of course, there are some significant variations between the two languages. Still, if you want to develop fluency in one or more African languages, Swahili is a good place to begin.

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10. Romanian:

Among the languages on this list is Romanian, which you might not have expected to see. However, even though Slavic-speaking countries surround Romania, Romanian is a Romance language that shares a lot of vocabulary with Italian, Spanish, and French.

For example, the phrase “La revedere,” used to say goodbye, is similar to the Italian phrase “Arrividerci.” In contrast, the phrase “Scuză-mă,” which means “Sorry,” is comparable to the French phrase “Excusez-Moi.”

As a bonus, it is a phonetic language, meaning that most words are spelled in the same way they are spoken.

Of course, there are also more difficult parts to learning this language, such as the changes in grammatical structures and the letters with “diacritics.”

Although Romanian is spoken by around 30 million people worldwide, most of whom live in Romania and Moldova; it is an unexpectedly simple language to learn.

What is the Usefulness of a language:

A language that you’re learning to better your chances of getting hired abroad is more motivating than a language that you’re learning only to get hired somewhere else.

The objective is to choose a simple language to learn that will provide you with a prize after your journey.

Will you be able to gain more self-confidence, obtain a better career, explore the world, or establish a relationship with a family member? Choose whatever option appeals to you.

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Conclusion on easiest languages to learn for English speakers

Just because you chose to study a language comparable to English does not imply that it will be simple.

Many of us are certainly aware of a friend or family member who possesses a tremendous amount of intrinsic talent that they were gifted with at birth.

However, they did not put out the necessary work, time, and energy to take their abilities to the next level.

Work ethic will always win out over talent in the long run. When it comes to language acquisition, it is necessary to put in the necessary time and effort to improve your abilities.

If you live in the United States, training your Spanish will be much easier than exercising your Swedish skills, which will be much more difficult if you live in Sweden. Unless, of course, you opt to learn a foreign language online.

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